Sunday, 19 November 2017

Companion Animal Psychology News November 2017

Make sure you haven't missed a thing with the latest newsletter from Companion Animal Psychology.

A dog and cat reading the latest news on dogs and cats



Some of my favourites from around the web this month


“Nobody wants to say goodbye to these adorable dogs for ever, but the truth is that it’s wrong to create animals that are destined to suffer.” Veterinarian Pete Wedderburn on how to improve the health of brachycephalic breeds such as Pugs and Bulldogs.

Dogs can promote friendliness just by hanging out by John Bradshaw PhD

Important take-aways from a separation anxiety journey by Tracy Krulik CTC. Emma’s Separation Anxiety Story: Epilogue.

“When people don’t notice fear in dogs, it can cause trouble.” The scariest thing, according to dogs by Julie Hecht.

Do dogs really manipulate us? Beware misleading headlines. Marc Bekoff PhD engages with his readers about reporting on two recent studies.

“Say you and I both live in houses made of banana peels….” Self-help for humans is good for dogs by Kristi Benson CTC

“The ginger creature appeared in my life randomly. Then, little by little, it wormed itself into my home and my heart.“ I adopted a stray cat. I had no idea what I was letting myself in for by Nigel Kendall in The Guardian

How much is that doggie on the website? It might not even exist.  Karin Brulliard on online pet sales scams.

Two nice DIY food toys for cats by Pawculture.

How to care for your older cat by Cats Protection, part of their campaign for #MatureMoggies.

It can be an especially upsetting problem to have... Why does my cat pee on the bed? by Pam Johnson-Bennett has some tips to help people understand and resolve this behaviour.

"Sometimes bad behavioral traits develop and no one’s to blame. And other times dogs overcome difficult situations to grow into the soul of friendliness. That’s nature. And that’s nurture." Jessika Hekman DVM PhD on untangling nature and nurture.


Photos, videos and podcasts


Photos of cats doing martial arts by Japanese photographer Hisakata Hiroyuki.

Modernist furniture for cats in Fukuoka. And you might also like these architect-designed dream homes for cats.

Prehistoric rock art from Saudi Arabia shows dogs on leashes.

Casey Elise Christopher photographs black cats to help them get adopted.

These cat-shaped desserts in Japan are very cute.

Dr. David Mellor talks to CBC about thriving not merely surviving: A fresh perspective on animal welfare.

Would you want to be a 21st century cat? Video of a talk by Dr. Sarah Ellis of International Cat Care.

Nine lives: Are you and your pets disaster ready? Podcast on how to prepare your cat for evacuation by Kathryn Primm DVM speaking to Debbie Martin CPDT-KA.


Here at Companion Animal Psychology


Some of you will have noticed a new affiliate advertiser on this website. If you purchase via my affiliate ads, it gives me a small commission at no extra charge to you, helping to support Companion Animal Psychology.

“It will forever change how we see our aquatic cousins - the pet goldfish included." This month’s book for the Companion Animal Psychology book club is What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of Our Underwater Cousins by Jonathan Balcombe.

My post on 5 things to do for your cat today has been very well received. It has five things to do right now, and a bonus sixth one to work on over time, to help you have a happier cat.

What is positive punishment in dog training? tells you everything you need to know about positive punishment, including the risks of using it. An essential read for dog owners.

And why do dogs play? looks at a new review of the literature on the reasons play has evolved in dogs, and the implications for animal welfare. It turns out play isn’t always a good sign.

Finally, after a bad experience, dogs’ sleep is affected just as we might have a bad night’s sleep after a stressful day.

As always, subscribe to Companion Animal Psychology to stay up-to-date on evidence-based information about our relationship with pets.


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1 comment:

  1. I totally disagree with Marc Bekoff about dogs and facial expressions – except really the use of the word ‘manipulation’. Dogs certainly communicate to us with facial expressions, and gaze direction.

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